SIA
Standards

In 2019, SIA’s standards efforts continued along the noble path of achieving higher security, functionality and interoperability, particularly in the world of access control, with several SIA Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) initiatives.

The 2019 SIA InteropFest – a special event highlighting interoperability among physical security solutions held at ISC West each year –showcased the demand of the OSDP specification in highly innovative environments as Jimmie Lee, head of security applications at Facebook Global Security delivered remarks on how standards efforts like SIA OSDP are increasingly important as the lines between physical security and information security blur rapidly. Lee was joined at the 2019 Interopfest by Jay Slaughterbeck, CEO of Strategic Security Solutions, a systems integrator that made the decision that because of customer demand and responsibility. OSDP will be the company’s default offering for security deployments – a growing trend among security integrators.

SIA Standards InteropFest 2019

With this increased activity in the SIA OSDP space, the SIA OSDP Working Group began offering instructional SIA OSDP Boot Camp training sessions in 2019. During these four daylong, hands-on crash courses, instructors explained the differences between OSDP and legacy systems and provided instruction to integrators and end users on how to configure OSDP devices and troubleshoot common issues. The working group began development on more OSDP Boot Camp offerings as well as lightweight OSDP education targeted to security systems integrators, security specifiers/consultants and managers, directors and technical staff responsible for the security at government facilities and corporate environments.

The changing connected context of the security industry impelled the SIA Cloud, Mobility and Internet of Things Subcommittee to release Challenges and Recommendations for Connected Physical Security Products. This report examines the threats – both old and new – faced by today’s connected physical security products by exploring real-world issues and common attack types and methods. Even more importantly, the paper provides the physical security vendor community a set of prioritized recommendations to design and deploy a secure physical security solution and provides a road map for adopting a secure development life cycle in their organizations.

Finally, advances in technology and standards can only move the security industry forward so far. Often, security decisions are business decisions not technology decisions. Considering this, SIA’s standards and technology team launched the Return on Security roundtable series with an informational breakfast event at ISC East that explored how security solutions are providing return on investment in a non-traditional security sense. Security products are gradually adding value to other facets of the enterprise business, such as human resources, research and development, operations and even sales and marketing. In a fight for consolidated budget, it is vitally important for the physical security industry to harness buy in and funding from nontraditional business areas. Highlighting how security technology influences both the bottom and top lines can only result in industry growth opportunities.